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  • Yahoo announced it's shutting down Yahoo Answers on Monday.
  • The question forum was for many years a popular place to ask very, very, stupid questions.
  • Users can download content from the site until June 30.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

Yahoo announced on Monday that it was shutting down one of its most iconic features - Yahoo Answers.

Yahoo Answers - the ephemeral internet place where no question was too dumb - will permanently shutter on May 4, The Verge first reported. 

Users can continue submitting questions until April 20, and the site will be available in read-only format until the 4th. After that, Yahoo Answers aficionados will have until June 30th to download any of their content from the site.

"While Yahoo Answers was once a key part of Yahoo's products and services, it has become less popular over the years as the needs of our members have changed," the company said in a statement. "To that end, we have decided to shift our resources away from Yahoo Answers to focus on products that better serve our members and deliver on Yahoo's promise of providing premium trusted content."

In a very on-brand move, Yahoo created a helpful FAQ to help users transition, which includes questions like "Where should I go when I have questions in the future?" (The answer is Yahoo Search, of course).

Yahoo Answers was for many a safe space to ask incredibly stupid - no, really, unbelievably stupid - questions anonymously. For example:

But the site is probably best known for the question "How is babby formed," which turned into a cross-platform super meme. The babby question was originally asked in 2006 by a user named Kavya, who was also curious about "how girl get pragnent."

The original post is long lost - it was posted during a beta test of Yahoo Answers and never archived - but spawned dozens of copycats.

Some of the later babbys.

This is far from the only beloved internet phenomenon Yahoo has sunsetted. It shut down Geocities - where thousands of early blogs made a home - in 2009, and killed off Yahoo Messenger in 2018.

Well, at least there's still Quora.


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