Police detain Patsy Stevenson at a vigil for Sarah Everard in London on March 13, 2021.
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  • A picture of a woman arrested at a vigil for a woman murdered by a police officer went viral.
  • Patsy Stevenson said around 50 officers have contacted her on Tinder since the Sarah Everard vigil.
  • She said it was "terrifying," and described the attention as "an intimidation thing."
  • For more stories go to www.BusinessInsider.co.za.

A woman who was arrested at a vigil for Sarah Everard, the victim of rape and murder by a policeman, said officers have been contacting her on Tinder since.

Patsy Stevenson, 28, told the BBC that around 50 officers contacted her on Tinder since the vigil, and that she was scared.

"They were all in uniform on their profiles or it said 'I'm a police officer'," she said.

"I do not understand why someone would do that. "It is almost like an intimidation thing, saying 'look we can see you', and that, to me, is terrifying.

"They know what I went through and they know that I'm fearful of police and they've done that for a reason."

London's Metropolitan Police told the BBC its officers "must abide by our high standards of professional behaviour, both on and off duty".

Stevenson also said she had received death threats, and was accused of being a crisis actor.

Images of Stevenson being restrained by police officers during a vigil for Everard in March spread widely and sparked backlash over police treatment of those who attended.

Police were widely criticised for how they handled the vigil in London's Clapham Common on March 13.

The vigil started peacefully, but attendees said that it was over-policed and clashes began. Photos and video footage showed officers shoving and arresting women at the event.

The UK police watchdog said later found that officers "acted appropriately."

Officer Wayne Couzens, Everard's killer, was sentenced to life in prison last week.

He pleaded guilty earlier this year to kidnapping, raping, and murdering her.

Everard, 33, was walking home from a friend's house in Clapham, south London, before she was killed.

Prosecutors said Couzens handcuffed Everard and showed her his warrant card to trick her into getting into his car.

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