Emergency services personnel search a collapsed building for survivors the day after a powerful earthquake struck on October 31, 2020 in Izmir, Turkey.
  • A Turkish woman has been rescued alive after being trapped under rubble for 17 hours following a 6.6 magnitude earthquake that hit Turkey and Greece yesterday.
  • Hulya Ozmet, later identified by the Anadolu News Agency, was rescued after the earthquake killed at least 27 people and injured around 800 people, The Guardian reported.
  • The earthquake's epicenter was in the Aegean Sea at 14:51 local time, 18 kilometres from Turkey's coastal city of Izmir in the Seferihisar district and at a depth of 16 kilometres, according to AFAD.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.


A Turkish woman has been rescued alive after being trapped under rubble for 17 hours following a 7.0 magnitude earthquake that hit Turkey and Greece yesterday. A Tweet posted by AFAD, the country's disaster and emergency management agency was captioned: "One of our citizens was rescued from the debris in Izmir. Our search and rescue efforts continue uninterruptedly."

 

Hulya Ozmet, later identified by the Anadolu News Agency, was rescued after the earthquake killed at least 27 people and injured around 800 more, The Guardian reported.

The earthquake's epicenter was in the Aegean Sea at 14:51 local time, 18 kilometres from Turkey's coastal city of Izmir in the Seferihisar district and at a depth of 16 kilometres, according to AFAD.

AFAD also recorded 407 aftershocks overnight with the Associated Press reporting that tremors in Istanbul, the Greek islands, Athens, and even in Bulgaria. A teenage boy and a teenage girl were also killed on Samos. They were hit by a collapsing wall while walking home from school in the port town of Vathy, according to The Telegraph.

A small tsunami was also triggered elsewhere in Seferihisar and on the Greek island of Samos, with residents told to avoid coastal areas by Eftyhmios Lekkas, President of Greece's Earthquake Planning and Protection Organisation, Reuters reported. 

Insider previously reported that Turkey is particularly earthquake-prone since several fault lines cross over it and added that over 17,000 people were killed in a 7.6-magnitude earthquake in Izmit in August 1999.

Read the original article on Insider

Receive a daily news update on your cellphone Or get the best of our site emailed to you.

Go to the Business Insider front page for more stories.