• Registered voters in Florida and Alaska have received threatening emails purporting to be from a far-right US group telling them: 'Vote for Trump on Election Day or we will come after you.'
  • The emails, which were obtained by outlets including the New York Times and CNN, appeared to come from an email address linked to the Proud Boys, a far-right US group.
  • But metadata reviewed by CNN and the New York Times indicated that the emails had been sent from foreign servers, and the group's chairman said the email is 'definitely not' from them.
  • Federal law enforcement agencies in Florida are investigating dozens of reports of such emails, according to the New York Times.
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Registered voters in at least two states have received threatening emails purporting to be from a far-right US group telling them to "Vote for Trump on Election Day or we will come after you."

The emails, which were received by voters in Florida and Alaska, and obtained by outlets including the New York Times and CNN, appeared to come from an email address linked to the Proud Boys, a far-right US group.

But metadata reviewed by CNN and the New York Times indicated that the emails had been sent from foreign servers. One email seen by the Times had been sent from Estonia, while another seen by CNN had been sent from a Saudi Arabian server, CNN reported.

 

"We are in possession of all your information (email, address, telephone ... everything)," read an email sent to one Florida voter, who shared the message with CNN.

"You are currently registered as a Democrat and we know this because we have gained access into the entire voting infrastructure. You will vote for Trump on Election Day or we will come after you.

"Change your party affiliation to Republican to let us know you received our message and will comply. We will know which candidate you voted for. I would take this seriously if I were you."

The email shown to CNN was sent from "info@officialproudboys.com" but the group's chairman, Enrique Tarrio, said the email is "definitely not" from them.

"We have spoken to the FBI and are working with them. I hope whoever did this is arrested for voter intimidation and for maliciously impersonating our group," Tarrio told CNN.

Federal law enforcement agencies in Florida are investigating dozens of reports of such emails, according to the New York Times, while a spokesperson for the Alaska Division of Elections told CNN that federal agencies had been made aware of the emails.

It is unclear how many people have received the emails but they appear to have been sent out en masse. At the University of Florida alone, a spokesperson for the college said, 183 people including students and staff had received the emails.

A spokesperson for the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency, the body which leads efforts to enhance US cybersecurity in elections, said it is aware of the emails.

"While we are looking into the emails, we can tell you this: your vote IS secret," the spokesperson said.

"These emails are meant to intimidate and undermine American voters' confidence in our elections. Don't fall for sensational and unverified claims."

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