The Trump Organization is claiming the money after laying off nearly 2,000 employees in the US.
  • The Trump Organisation is seeking bailout funds from the UK and Irish governments to pay for staff furloughed during the coronavirus lockdown.
  • Under the schemes, companies can claim back between 70-85% of the wages of furloughed staff up to a capped amount.
  • Some locals are angry that taxpayers will have to foot the bill.
  • "If what he says about his personal wealth is true, Trump doesn't need the money, and I don't see why UK taxpayers of the future should be helping him out," one Scottish councillor told Bloomberg.
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The Trump Organisation is seeking bailout funds from the UK and Irish governments to pay the wages of furloughed workers in its European golf courses during the coronavirus lockdown.

Under government schemes in Ireland and the UK, businesses can claim back the costs of paying between 70-85% of the wages of furloughed staff, up to a capped amount.

The schemes, which are designed to prevent job losses during the pandemic, are being implemented at huge costs to European taxpayers.

However, the Trump Organisation is not eligible for similar payments in the US, where it has reportedly already laid off nearly 2,000 workers.

Trump has previously boasted that his golf course in Aberdeen, Scotland is "perhaps the greatest golf course anywhere in the world" and suggested that its continued existence improves relations with the UK.

However, the resort is reportedly losing a million dollars a year and is unpopular with many locals.

The news that the Trump Organisation is claiming bailout money for staff at the resort has angered some locals Bloomberg News reported.

"The huge tab for this will be borne throughout the whole population through higher taxes," Martin Ford, who is an elected councillor in Aberdeen said.

"If what he says about his personal wealth is true, Trump doesn't need the money, and I don't see why UK taxpayers of the future should be helping him out."

One business owner near Trump's Doonbeg resort in Ireland said the decision would help the local community, however.

"If by availing itself of government subsidies it keeps the business employing people here, then, of course, they should use it," Rita McInerney told Bloomberg.

"The Trump Organisation have been very good to the local community."

A representative for the company defended the decision to make the claims.

"Like millions of businesses around the globe, we have been forced by government mandate to temporarily close our hospitality and leisure facilities," Sarah Malone, executive vice president of the Trump resort in Aberdeenshire, told Bloomberg.

"We are no different to any other business, including many media companies -- this has nothing to do with Trump and does not benefit the business -- the actions we have taken are solely to protect people and their families who would otherwise be out of work and struggling to survive financially."

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