U.S. President Donald Trump holds a campaign rally at John Murtha Johnstown-Cambria County Airport in Johnstown, Pennsylvania, U.S. October 13, 2020.
  • US President Donald Trump tried to appeal to female voters in the suburbs, saying "Suburban women, will you please like me? Please. Please. I saved your damn neighbourhood, OK?"
  • Trump addressed the group of voters he has struggled to reach during a campaign rally in Johnstown, Pennsylvania, on Tuesday.
  • The president slammed Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden for backing Obama-era fair housing regulations, painting his support for it as Biden waging "war on the suburbs."
  • Earlier this year, the Trump administration rolled back the Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing (AFFH) mandate, a federal regulation put in place in 2015 by the Obama administration to strengthen the Fair Housing Act established in 1968.
  • The AFFH regulation is designed to aid the effort to "overcome historic patterns of segregation, promote fair housing choice, and foster inclusive communities that are free from discrimination," according to the Housing and Urban Development website.
  • During the rally, the president said the regulation "destroyed your neighbourhoods and brought crime to the suburbs."
  • Though the president tried to appeal to "suburban women," polls have shown that likely female voters largely prefer Biden over Trump.
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US president Donald Trump made a plea to female voters in the suburbs Tuesday, saying "Suburban women, will you please like me? Please. Please. I saved your damn neighbourhood, OK?"

Trump addressed the group of voters he has struggled to reach during a campaign rally in Johnstown, Pennsylvania, on Tuesday, saying he was no longer referring to them as a "suburban housewife" because he used to get "heat" for using the term.

He said he now refers to the voting group as "suburban women" now, adding, "but does anybody care?"

Trump made this comment after he slammed Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden for backing an Obama-era fair-housing regulation, painting his support for it as Biden waging "war on the suburbs."

Earlier this year, the Trump administration rolled back the Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing (AFFH) mandate, a federal regulation put in place in 2015 by the Obama administration to strengthen the Fair Housing Act established in 1968.

The AFFH regulation is designed to aid the effort to "overcome historic patterns of segregation, promote fair housing choice, and foster inclusive communities that are free from discrimination," according to the Housing and Urban Development website

By repealing the regulation, it does not interfere with local zoning but rather establishes criteria for receiving federal funds, a move which "fundamentally revised how the federal government polices bias by landlords, lenders, and others in the housing industry," according to an article by Bloomberg's CityLab.

The move did not formally repeal the fair housing rule, and in early 2020 HUD Secretary Ben Carson issued a proposal to revise and essentially eliminate the AFFH mandate in January of this year.

Though the president tried to appeal to "suburban women," polls have shown that likely female voters largely prefer Biden over Trump.

"According to the Centre for American Women and Politics at Rutgers University, Biden leads among women voters by an average of 18.6 percentage points in the 46 national polls tracked by the organisation," Business Insider's Madison Hall reported.

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