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'Squid Game' creator says on-set gun safety very different in Korea: 'I have never seen a real bullet'

Business Insider US

  • "Squid Game" creator Hwang Dong-hyuk told Variety about gun safety in South Korea.
  • Hwang was asked about his safety precautions following the fatal shooting on the "Rust" set.
  • Hwang said that bullets aren't easily accessible in South Korea so were not used in the show.
  • For more stories go to www.BusinessInsider.co.za.

"Squid Game" creator Hwang Dong-hyuk told Variety that he has "never seen a real bullet" when asked about safety precautions on his set.

One of the main attractions for fans of "Squid Game," Netflix's most-watched show of all time, is its graphic violence. The series follows a group of morally-grey characters who take part in children's games with deadly twists in order to win enough money to pay off their debts.

Following the tragic fatal shooting of cinematographer Halyna Hutchins on the set of "Rust" last month, Hwang was asked in an interview with Variety about how he ensures his cast and crew are safe around the guns used on the show.

"We of course have a prop master, but also in Korea, we're not really a gun-owning country, so only the police can have and own a gun," the "Squid Game" director said. "Because of that, bullets are not really easily as distributed as they are maybe here, so there's a very low, low possibility of any safety issues happening on set.

"In my life, I have never seen a real bullet. I have only seen them in the movies."

Park Hae-soo, who plays Cho Sang-woo on the hit Korean drama, told Variety: "I felt so sad about [the 'Rust'] tragedy. I just want to relay my condolences."

On October 21, actor Alec Baldwin fatally shot "Rust" cinematographer Hutchins and injured the film's director Joel Souza with a Colt revolver while rehearsing a scene on the Bonanza Creek Ranch, authorities have said.

According to an affidavit seen by The New York Times, "Rust" assistant director David Halls said "cold gun" when he handed the gun to Baldwin, meaning the gun was not loaded with live rounds. However, authorities say that live ammunition had been loaded into the gun.

A number of directors and production companies have banned live guns on their sets following the fatal shooting, including "The Boys" showrunner Eric Kripke and Dwayne Johnson's production company Seven Bucks Productions.

Baldwin recently said in a since-deleted tweet that a police officer should be present on all film and TV sets to "monitor weapons safety." The governor of New Mexico also threatened to tighten safety regulations on movie sets if Hollywood does not.

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