• Global demand for flowers has plummeted during the coronavirus pandemic. As a result, nurseries are having to destroy millions of flowers each day.
  • The global floriculture market was valued at $67.3 billion (1.2 trillion) in 2017 and projected to reach $103.9 billion (R1.9 trillion) by 2026, according to a report by Market Research.
  • In April, Bloomberg Businessweek reported on the massive multibillion-dollar flower industry has taken due to the pandemic.
  • Business Insider Today spoke with flower farmers in Gaza, Costa Rica, and Russia to learn how the coronavirus has impacted their businesses.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

With flower shops closed and celebrations canceled due to coronavirus restrictions, demand for flowers has plummeted.

Source: Business Insider Today


Mother's Day in the United States, which is celebrated on the second weekend of May, drives peak demand in Costa Rica, flower farm manager William Quiros told Reuters.

Source: Business Insider Today, Reuters


Quiros estimates that his country's flower industry lost $25 million (R458 million) in March and April due in large part to the drop in exports to North America.

Source: Business Insider Today, Reuters


Without their usual sales, farmers have had their work cut in half and been tasked with shredding the flowers.

Source: Business Insider Today, Reuters


In Russia, 1.2 million roses are being destroyed each day, according to the Russian Greenhouse Union.

Source: Business Insider Today, Reuters


"At the time of this pandemic, it's clear that no one needs flowers," Adriana Sidorova, a process engineer at Roscha Flower Farm in St. Petersburg told Reuters last month.

Source: Business Insider Today, Reuters


Maher Muhammed Abu Daqa, who owns a flower farm in Khan Younis, Gaza, told Business Insider Today that he discards between 3,000 to 5,000 flowers every day.

Source: Business Insider Today


Neighbours often come by and pick up the scraps to feed them to their animals.

Source: Business Insider Today


Abu Daqa said his nursery hasn't made any sales since March 17.

Source: Business Insider Today,


He can no longer afford to pay his staff of 10 and faces large debts with fertiliser and pesticide companies.

Source: Business Insider Today


Sales have also fallen at a nursery on the Gaza Strip in Rafah about six miles away.

Source: Business Insider Today


"Before the coronavirus, we used to sell to 10 or 14 shops. Now there are only one or two places that buy every three to four days," flower farm manager Lubad Hijazy told Business Insider Today.

Source: Business Insider Today


Instead of harvesting flowers to be packaged and sold, the few workers left at these nurseries cut the crops and throw them in the trash.

Source: Business Insider Today


While the fate of his farm is unclear, Hijazy is continuing to plant flowers in anticipation of future demand.

Source: Business Insider Today


"We will be in debt, but we say that we should continue being hopeful, and when the coronavirus is over, the situation will be better than it was," Hijazy told Business Insider Today.