The protest on Barangaroo Wharf, in Sydney, Australia, displayed signs that read "fish feel pain" and "stop floundering, go vegan."

  • PETA protesters painted themselves with blue body paint, wore fake bloodied fish hooks, and wrapped themselves in nets to resemble dead fish at a protest on Thursday.
  • The sometimes controversial animal rights group was protesting Sydney Fish Market's pre-Christmas "festive frenzy" event, an annual 36-hour saefood marathon.
  • PETA UK told Insider the "fish" started their demonstration at 10 a.m. local time and stayed for one hour.
  • In a press release, PETA said fish feel pain, have unique personalities, recognize human faces, retain memories, and think ahead.
  • Spokesperson for PETA, Emily Rice, said: "This festive period, PETA is urging everyone to extend the season of goodwill to fish and all other animals by choosing delicious vegan Christmas meals."
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Vegan activists dressed up as dead fish on Thursday morning in protest against Sydney's Fish Market in the run-up to Christmas.

Covering themselves in blue body paint, wearing bloodied fake fish hooks, and lying under netting, the activists displayed signs that read "fish feel pain" and "stop floundering, go vegan."

The "fish" wore fake bloodied hooks in their mouths and were surrounded by pretend marine life.

The protest saw them lying on blue tarpaulin surrounded by fake marine life at Barangaroo Wharf in Sydney, Australia.

PETA UK told Insider the vegan protesters started at 10 a.m. local time and were there for roughly one hour.

The protest occurred just two days after the country recorded its hottest day in history on Tuesday.

The animal rights group was demonstrating against next Monday's annual 36-hour seafood marathon at Sydney Fish Market. The pre-Christmas event, known as "festive frenzy," sees thousands of seafood lovers descend on the market to pick up fresh produce for their Christmas feasts.

Their protest was against the pre-Christmas "festive frenzy" event, at Sydney's Fish Market.

PETA spokesperson Emily Rice said: "The 'festive frenzy' is a 36-hour representation of the hell on Earth endured by fish who are netted, dragged out of their aquatic homes, and cut open, all so that their flesh can be sold to consumers.

"This festive period, PETA is urging everyone to extend the season of goodwill to fish and all other animals by choosing delicious vegan Christmas meals."

PETA claim fish feel pain, have unique personalities, recognize human faces, retain memories, and think ahead.

PETA said in a press release that fish feel pain, have unique personalities, recognize human faces, retain memories, and think ahead. It claims more fish are killed for food than any other animal, which is why they're measured in tonnes, rather than counted as individuals.

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