Wykus Lamprecht's award-winning pumpkin. Photo: Landbou.com
  • A 790kg pumpkin has just been named the biggest ever cultivated north of the Orange River.
  • The pumpkin took 200 litres of water a day to grow, was cuddled in blankets and a fan kept its stem dry.  
  • Last year, a 860kg pumpkin from the Western Cape officially became the biggest in the southern hemisphere. 
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A giant pumpkin of almost 800kg has just been named the heaviest ever cultivated north of the Orange River.

Wykus Lamprecht of Meyerton in Gauteng grew the pumpkin from a seed planted in October last year, Landbou.com reported.

The fast-growing pumpkin was named Johanna, and required at least 200 litres of water a day, Lamprecht told Landbou.com. Some days, this would run up to as much as 700 litres.

The pumpkin was nurtured under a gazebo to protect it against the sun and rain, and a fan kept its stem dry. (A moist stem can cause decay.) Johanna was also wrapped in blankets at times to shield it against the elements.

Johanna was a triumph after a difficult year for Lamprecht, who lost many pumpkins due to disease in 2019. After testing the soil, he consulted with agricultural experts to secure the right supplements.

Wykus Lamprecht

Weighing in at 790kg, Johanna won the "Goliat van Gat" competition in Pretoria for the biggest pumpkin last week, with a record weight for the competition.

But the title for the biggest ever pumpkin cultivated in South Africa – in the whole southern hemisphere, in fact – was awarded last year to a pumpkin that weighed 860kg, Landbou.com reported.

The biggest pumpkin in the southern hemisphere, cultivated by Piet Lotz, a farmer of Riversdale. Photo: Landbou.com

Piet Lotz, a farmer of Riversdale, grew the pumpkin from Giant Atlantic pumpkin seed from the US – and plans to grow a one-tonner next, Landbou reported.


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