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  • The Lestina family was getting ready to put their home in Bagley, Iowa, on the market, when they discovered that their basement had flooded - with animal blood.
  • The Lestinas live next to Dahl's Meat Locker, and the two buildings share a drainage system. However, when the meat locker's system backed up, their basement was filled with nearly five inches of animal blood, fat, and bone.
  • Lestina told the Register will cost an estimated $2,300 (R34,00), and the meat locker offered to help clean up the mess financially.
  • For more go to Business Insider.

With Halloween just around the corner, this Iowa family won't need to spend any money on spooky house decorations.

The Lestina family was getting ready to put their home in Bagley, Iowa, on the market, when they discovered that their basement had flooded - with animal blood.

"Nobody wants to see that, smell that," homeowner Nick Lestina told NBC-affiliate KTIV. "I wouldn't want that for anybody to have that in their house."

The Lestinas live next to Dahl's Meat Locker, and the two buildings share a drainage system, KTIV reported. However, when the meat locker's system backed up while getting rid of hog and cattle remains on October 3, the Lestina's basement was filled with nearly five inches of animal blood, fat, and bone.

"If you can imagine, I mean, the smell is just like biodegrading meat," Nick Lestina told CBS-affiliate KCCI.

He added that the family of seven was not allowed to stay in the house because of the bio-hazard.

"I just want to move back into my house," Lestina told the Des Moines Register. "I'm not looking for a pity party. I just want them to take responsibility for what's been caused. I feel that's fair."

Lestina told KTIV that many of the family's belongings were ruined in the blood flood, including a bed the family was saving for their toddler son.

Lestina told the Register repairs will cost an estimated $2,300 (R34,000), and the meat locker offered to help clean up the mess financially.

"We don't want to harm anybody; we're not bad people," Kaitlin Dahl, who owns the meat processing facility, told the Register. "We're trying to make a living, not enemies."

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