The Indonesian submarine with 53 people aboard is believed to have sunk about 60 miles off the northern coast of Bali Island after going missing on Wednesday.
  • Items have been discovered from the missing Indonesian submarine, including prayer rugs.
  • The submarine is now presumed to be 'sunk', Indonesia's Navy Chief of Staff said.
  • Hopes of rescuing the 53 crew members who were on board have now faded.
  • See more stories on Business Insider SA's home page.

Items have been discovered from the missing Indonesian submarine, Indonesia's Navy Chief of Staff Admiral Yudo Margono said on Saturday.

Rescuers found a grease bottle, parts of a torpedo, and prayer rugs from the submarine, the Associated Press reported.

"With the authentic evidence we found believed to be from the submarine, we have now moved from the 'sub miss' phase to 'sub sunk,'" Margon said during a press conference.

Hopes have now faded of rescuing the 53 crew members who were on board the submarine.

The submarine, the KRI Nanggala-402, disappeared without a trace on Wednesday off the island of Bali.

It went missing during a torpedo drill, a navy spokesperson told Insider.

Countries from around the world chipped in to help find the missing naval submarine. But time had been  running out to save the crew members as the vessel only had enough oxygen to last until today.

The 44-year-old German-made submarine had been participating in a torpedo drill being carried out in the Bali Strait, a stretch of water between the islands of Java and Bali, that connects the Indian Ocean to the Bali Sea.

The KRI Nanggala-402 lost contact during a dive at around 4:30 local time on Wednesday. This was close to one and a half hours after the submarine asked for "permission to dive" from the exercise's task force at around 03:00.

According to Reuters, an aerial search revealed an oil spill near the dive position at around 07:00 local time on Wednesday.

The KRI Nanggala-402 most recently went through a refit in 2012.

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