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  • The National Treasury has set up an email address specifically for ideas around the novel coronavirus, at COVID-19@treasury.gov.za.
  • It would like ideas on "how best government can use the already very limited public finances" to deal with the disease caused by SARS-CoV-2.
  • Economic stimulus measures, and helping small business and individuals through the economic consequences of measures such as social distancing, are expected to be top agenda items this week.
  • For more stories go to www.BusinessInsider.co.za.


You can now send the government an email with your ideas on how it should spend money to fight Covid-19.

Such ideas are now welcome via the email address COVID-19@treasury.gov.za, the National Treasury announced on Monday.

It is intended for "suggestions on how best government can use the already very limited public finances" to deal with the crisis caused by the disease.

"Please share suggestions and ideas around how all South Africans can work together to overcome the virus," the Treasury said in a separate statement.

After a focus last week on limiting social interaction and creating the legal basis for related control measures, various parts of the government are now shifting to preparations for the economic fallout of the coronavirus. Measures to combat the spread of the virus are expected to be devastating for different sectors, including tourism and entertainment, regardless of the actual impact of the disease.

Standard Bank has announced measures to give small businesses and students debt-repayment holidays, while Nedbank has promised to help customers in similar fashion.

Sections of the government that deal with small business in particular have promised to announce support measures this week, on top of broader fiscal and tax measures expected to be announced by President Cyril Ramaphosa.

While other countries have announced massive injections of cash aimed at the most vulnerable parts of their economies, South Africa is already deeply indebted and was on the road to a record deficit even before Covid-19 was first detected.

(Compiled by Phillip de Wet)

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