Photograph Jay Caboz
The Leon Thevenin in Cape Town harbour. It left at 9pm on Wednesday 22 January. Photograph Jay Caboz.
  • After a brief delay, the Leon Thevenin left Cape Town harbour at 9pm last night. 
  • It's currently on its way past  St Helena Bay, en route to fixing the broken undersea cables which brought about slow internet in South Africa
  • Leon Thevenin is expected to arrive at the first break late on 28 January - weather dependent.   
  • It will then need at least 48 hours to repair the cable, its owner company Orange Marine told Business Insider South Africa.
  • For more stories, go to www.BusinessInsider.co.za.

After a brief delay, the Leon Thevenin left Cape Town harbour at just before 9pm last night. 

Source: Marine Traffic
Source: Marine Traffic

It's currently on its way past St Helena Bay, en route to fixing the broken undersea cables which brought about slow internet in South Africa. 

The repair ship was expected to leave Cape Town harbour on Wednesday at around 6pm. 

Onboard is the Leon Thevenin is a crew of 53, including senior representatives from the WACS and SAT3 consortiums, led by Chief of Mission, Didier Mainguy, said Openserve.  

The cable layer vessel is expected to arrive at the first break late on 28 January- weather dependent, according to South African National Research and Education Network (SA NREN). 

Leon Thevenin  has been tasked with repairing both underseas cables (the West Africa Cable System (Wacs) and the South Atlantic 3/West Africa (SAT-3/Wasc)) which went down in the early hours of last Thursday, 16 January 2020, said Openserve

Source: Marine Traffic
Source: Marine Traffic

“The vessel will need about 6 days to arrive to the areas where the cables have been cut. Then, at least 48 hours will be needed to repair the cables,” Jean-Luc Vuillemin Executive Vice President, Orange International Networks, Infrastructures & Services, told Business Insider South Africa.

Since 2013 its main base of operations has been out of Cape Town and it oversees the maintenance operations for the South Atlantic and Indian ocean cables. It performs a quarter of the repairs in the Atlantic Ocean out of 30 vessels operating on this contract in this area, says Orange Marine.

Commercial undersea cable communications carry over 97% of all intercontinental electronic communications.

*This is a developing story. 


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