Russia vaccine
Medical workers in protective gear prepare to draw blood from volunteers participating in a trial of a coronavirus vaccine at the Budenko Main Military Hospital outside Moscow, Russia, on July 15, 2020.
  • The cumulative total of coronavirus cases worldwide passed 30 million in the early hours of Friday, according to the Johns Hopkins University COVID-19 tracker
  • As of Friday, there have been 30,175,496 reported cases. More than half of them were recorded in the US, India, Brazil and Russia.
  • This figure has doubled in just under two months, since the 15 millionth case was recorded on July 22.
  • Almost a million people have died from the virus since it began to spread at the start of the year. 
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Total reported cases of the coronavirus worldwide passed 30 million in the early hours of Friday.

The figure has doubled in around two months — the 15 millionth case was recorded on July 22.

There have been 30,175,496 reported cases since COVID-10 first began to spread in Wuhan, China, according to the Johns Hopkins University COVID-19 tracker.

These figures represent all-time cases, and many of those infected will have since recovered. Many also died — so far 946,063 deaths have been attributed to COVID-19, according to the tracker. 

The US has contributed the largest number of confirmed infections that largest proportion of the reported, at just under 6.7 million.

India, Brazil, and Russia are the next worst-affected countries. Between them, those four nations represent more than half of the 30 million cases.

Almost 200,000 people in the US have died with COVID-19. 

The World Health Organisation declared the coronavirus a pandemic on March 11, when reported global cases stood at 126,000.

The true number of cases, and deaths, is higher than recorded by the Johns Hopkins tracker.

This is because not all who are infected are tested, and methods of reporting and classifying these figures varies country to country. Some countries have been accused of intentionally under-reporting cases. 

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