New bodycam footage shows the moments leading up to George Floyd's death in May.

  • Bodycam footage shows George Floyd pleading with officers during his fatal May 25 arrest.
  • The video - obtained by DailyMail.com - offers a new perspective into Floyd's death.
  • It includes footage from the bodycam of officer Thomas Lane, who at one point aims a gun at Floyd's face. Floyd begs him not to shoot.
  • Officer Derek Chauvin, who knelt on Floyd's neck for more than eight minutes, appears late in the video.
  • Chauvin has been charged with Floyd's murder. The three other offices involved have been charged with aiding and abetting murder.
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Newly-published bodycam footage shows George Floyd crying and pleading with officers in the minutes before his May 25 killing.

The video, obtained by DailyMail.com and posted on Monday, offers new insight on Floyd's fatal arrest.

At one point early in the encounter, officer Thomas Lane points a gun at Floyd's head while he is still inside his car.

According to DailyMail.com, the footage was taken from the lapel videos of both Lane and and Officer Alex Kueng, who were called to investigate Floyd for allegedly trying to pass a counterfeit $20 bill.

The outlet said the footage was filed with the Hennepin County District Court by Lane's defense attorney. The DailyMail.com footage is a recording of a monitor on a table playing the bodycam video.

The eight-minute video starts with the officers approaching Floyd as he sat in his car, and ordering him to put up his hands.

Floyd appears nervous and is immediately apologetic, but doesn't initially follow their instructions to show his hands. In response, Lane pulls out his handgun and aims it at Floyd.

Floyd complies, putting his hands on the wheel and tells the officer he's sorry and asks what he's done wrong.

He starts to cry and says that he had been shot before and begs Lane not to shoot him.

"Please don't shoot me Mr. Officer," Floyd says.

Lane then gets Floyd to come out of the car and puts him in handcuffs.

Kueng can be heard telling Floyd "stop resisting."

Lane then begins interviewing a man and woman who were with Floyd in the car.

"Why is he getting all squirrely and not showing us his hands?" Lane asks the two.

"Because he's been shot before," a woman, who identifies herself as Floyd's ex, tells the officer.

"He's a good guy," the male passenger adds.

The video then cuts to the two officers leading Floyd to their SUV.

As they try to get him to sit in the back of the car, Floyd appears to grow desperate.

"Please, I'm claustrophobic," he says.

"Please, stay with me man," he tells Lane.

"Imma die here. Imma a die man. And I just had COVID, I don't want to go back to that," Floyd continues.

An autopsy in June confirmed that Floyd had tested positive for COVID-19, but did not cite the disease as a factor in his death.

Eventually Officers Derek Chauvin and Tou Thao show up and help get Floyd into the car, but he ends up coming out on the other side of the vehicle.

Officers then bring Floyd to the ground, and he can be heard repeatedly saying he can't breathe.

"I just had COVID man, I can't breathe," Floyd says as the video cuts out.

Chauvin would go on to kneel on Floyd's neck for more than eight minutes, before he died in custody.

All four officers involved in Floyd's arrest were fired from the department the following day, and have all been charged in connection to his death.

Chauvin faces charges of second-degree murder, third-degree murder, and second-degree manslaughter, while the three other officers were charged with aiding and abetting second-degree murder.

A tentative trial date has been set for March 8, 2021.

Insider reached out to both the Minneapolis Police Department and the Hennepin County District Court for comment on how the footage got out, but have not heard back from either as of Tuesday morning.

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