The McDonald's in Pueblo Libre, Lima, where the workers died on Sunday.

  • McDonald's closed every restaurant in Peru for 48 hours in memory of two employees who died when they were electrocuted while cleaning a soda machine.
  • Alexandra Porras, 19, and Gabriel Campos, 18, were killed early Sunday while working a night shift at a restaurant in Lima.
  • Porras was shocked by a loose wire as she cleaned behind a drinks machine. Campos tried to help but was also electrocuted, The New York Times reported.
  • "We share the immense pain of the families of our dead collaborators," McDonald's Peru said. "We have decreed from this morning two days of mourning."
  • On Tuesday, demonstrators gathered outside the McDonald's in the upmarket Pueblo Libre neighborhood to protests against poor working conditions in the country.
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Every McDonald's in Peru closed for two days of mourning after the sudden deaths of two teen employees who were electrocuted while cleaning a soda machine.

Alexandra Porras, 19, and Gabriel Campos, 18, died in the early hours of Sunday while working a night shift at a restaurant in central Lima, according to The New York Times.

Porras was cleaning behind a the soda machine when she was electrocuted by a loose wire.

When Campos, also her ex-boyfriend from high school, tried to intervene he was also killed, the Times said. Both were dead when authorities arrived.

"We have decreed from this morning two days of mourning, so all of our restaurants will remain closed," McDonald's Peru said in a statement posted to Twitter on Tuesday.

"We share the immense pain of the families of our dead collaborators."

"We are working to determine the details of what happened and will contribute with everything necessary in the investigation," it said.

A file image of people holding McDonald's products.

There are 31 McDonald's locations in Peru. They are all operated by Arcos Dorados, a company which operates dozens of franchises across South America.

It is unclear whether employees in Peru will be paid for the hours they will lose to the mourning period.

On Tuesday, demonstrators gathered outside the restaurant in the upmarket Pueblo Libre neighbourhood where the pair died to protest poor working conditions.

Porras' mother, Jhoana Inga, told media at the protest that her daughter often complained she wasn't given proper safety equipment like gloves and boots, the Guardian said.

McDonald's legal representative Ricardo Elias said Tuesday that the police had completed initial investigations.

"The police have carried out all the proceedings. And we as a company have complied with giving them all the information and access to the required spaces of the establishment," he told told local journalists, according to the Guardian.

Porras planned to be a lawyer and then a judge, according to the Times, and had started working at the McDonald's three months ago to help her mother pay household bills.

Peru's workplace safety department, Superintendencia Nacional de Fiscalización Laboral, said it began an investigation into conditions at the McDonald's on Monday, the Times reported.

Peru is in the midst of mass protests over woeful government services, and the president's decision in late September to shut down Peru's congress to pass an anti-corruption bill.

More than 100,000 Peruvian healthcare workers took to the streets in late November to demand better services and medications for their patients.


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