Divers experience Deep Dive Dubai, the deepest swimming pool in the world reaching 60m, in the United Arab Emirates, July 10, 2021.
  • With a depth of nearly 60 metres, Deep Dive Dubai is the deepest swimming pool for diving in the world.
  • The pool is filled with the equivalent of six Olympic-sized swimming pools.
  • It is also equipped with 56 cameras to keep divers safe.
  • For more stories go to www.BusinessInsider.co.za.

Dubai is home to the world's tallest skyscraper, the biggest shopping mall, and the largest performing fountain. Now, the "City of Superlatives" is adding another title to its list: The world's deepest indoor diving pool.

Deep Dive Dubai has a depth of close to 60 metres, breaking the Guinness World record for the deepest swimming pool for diving in the world. It unseated the previous record holder, DeepSpot Poland, by almost 15 metres. 

For now, the pool is open by invite only.

The pool is filled with the equivalent of six Olympic-sized swimming pools, according to the company.

A diver experiences Deep Dive Dubai, the deepest swimming pool in the world reaching 60m, in the United Arab Emirates, July 10, 2021.

The water temperature is maintained at a comfortable 30 degrees Celsius, so divers can jump in wearing a thin diving suit or a swimsuit. 

The pool is not yet open to the public, but Dubai crown prince Sheikh Hamdan — an avid diver — is among the attraction's early visitors, reported the Khaleej Times. Actor Will Smith also visited the pool, posting a video of himself on his Instagram account.

Beneath the surface is a manmade, modern-day Atlantis.

A diver plays mock chess as he experiences Deep Dive Dubai, the deepest swimming pool in the world reaching 60m, in the United Arab Emirates, July 10, 2021.

The pool was clearly designed with Instagram in mind, as it's filled with props and sets — like the chess board pictured above — for divers to pose with.

It comes with what the company calls "state-of-the-art lighting and sound systems" to create different moods underwater, so it's no surprise that the pool is also an underwater film studio, complete with an editing suite nearby.

The sunken city is set up with various props that include a motorcycle and a shopping cart.

A diver rides a mock bike as he experiences Deep Dive Dubai, the deepest swimming pool in the world reaching 60m, in the United Arab Emirates, July 10, 2021.

With its underwater caves and rooms featuring different themes and things for divers to do, Deep Dive Dubai director Jarrod Jablonski said "it's really not fair to call it a pool."

"There are quite a few dive pools in the world that are deep, but this one is so much more interesting," he said.

Deep Dive Dubai did not immediately respond to requests for comment regarding the price of the pool's construction.

And it's not just for experts: The pool is open to amateurs looking to learn diving.

A diver browses mock books as he experiences Deep Dive Dubai, the deepest swimming pool in the world reaching 60m, in the United Arab Emirates, July 10, 2021.

The pool is 15 minutes from downtown Dubai. 

An hour's dive will set you back between $135 and $410 (R1,890 and R5,740), AFP reported. The company has said it will be open to public soon.

Deep Dive will also be offering diving courses for amateurs in addition to refresher courses.

Non-divers can peer in on the underwater world through a series of windows and screens.

A diver experiencing Deep Dive Dubai, the deepest swimming pool in the world reaching 60m, photographs a waiter through a viewing glass, July 10, 2021.

The pool is equipped with 56 cameras to monitor divers and keep them safe.

Members of staff monitor the surface as divers experience Deep Dive Dubai, the deepest swimming pool in the world reaching 60m, in the United Arab Emirates, July 10, 2021

The cameras cover the entire pool and are monitored so lifeguards can react to situations. 

There is also a hyperbaric facility — or oxygen therapy chamber — to treat divers in the event of accidents. 

In case you're in a hurry to visit the city's famed Burj Khalifa after a dive, the company has a notice on their website recommending that people wait "18-24 hours before ascending higher than 300 meters/1000 feet."

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