(Getty)

  • Darren and Carolyn Carter, from Edmonton in Alberta, were pictured kissing behind a lion they killed during a trophy hunt safari in South Africa.
  • The photo was shared to a Facebook page for Legelela Safaris - a tour company that specializes in big game hunting - which has since been deleted.
  • Though the tour company deleted its Facebook page, the image of the Carters kissing is still circulating on social media, with people voicing outrage over it.
  • When not they're not trophy hunting in South Africa, the Carters work as taxidermists.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

A Canadian couple is facing backlash over a photo they took while on a safari, showing the pair kissing behind a lion they killed.

Darren and Carolyn Carter, from Edmonton in Alberta, posed with the animal while trophy hunting in South Africa, according to The Independent.

Read: Here’s how canned South African lions are advertised to UK hunters – for up to R780,000 each

The photo was shared to a Facebook for Legelela Safaris - a Free State tour company that specializes in big game hunting - which has since been deleted.

"Hard work in the hot Kalahari sun … well done," the photo was captioned. "A monster lion."

Another image featuring a different dead cat was captioned, according to The Independent: "There is nothing like hunting the king of the jungle."

Though the tour company deleted its Facebook page, the image of the Carters kissing is still circulating on social media, with people voicing outrage over it. 

Eduardo Goncalves, the founder of the Campaign to Ban Trophy Hunting told The Independent that the lion looked as though it was a tame animal bred for the "sole purpose of being the subject of a smug selfie."

He said the animal was likely killed in an enclosure.

"This couple should be utterly ashamed of themselves, not showing off and snogging for the cameras," Goncalves said.

It remains unclear when the big game hunt the Carters participated in took place.

When not they're not trophy hunting in South Africa, the Carters work as taxidermists according to a now-deleted Instagram.

Insider contacted the Carters and Legelela Safaris for comment.

According to Panthera, a nonprofit dedicated to the preservation of big cats, the lion population is threatened by trophy hunting.

A 2009 report from the International Union for the Conservation of Nature, found that 600 lions are killed for sport every year.