Tech

China says its giant 'Sky Eye' telescope may have picked up signals from alien civilisations

Business Insider US
Visitors watch a model of the 500-meter aperture spherical radio telescope (FAST), also known as Chinas Sky Eye, during the 4th Digital China Summit at Fuzhou Strait International Conference and Exhibition Center on April 26, 2021 in Fuzhou, Fujian Province of China. (Photo by Yang Enuo/VCG via Getty Images)
Visitors watch a model of the 500-meter aperture spherical radio telescope (FAST), also known as Chinas Sky Eye, during the 4th Digital China Summit at Fuzhou Strait International Conference and Exhibition Center on April 26, 2021 in Fuzhou, Fujian Province of China. (Photo by Yang Enuo/VCG via Getty Images)
  • China's science ministry said its giant telescope may have found signals from alien civilisations.
  • It said signals were identified this year by the "Sky Eye" telescope, the world's largest. 
  • However, scientists on the programme said the new signals could just be radio interference.
  • For more stories go to www.BusinessInsider.co.za.

Chinese scientists say the country's giant "Sky Eye" telescope may have picked up signs of an alien civilisation.

Researchers with Beijing Normal University found "several cases of possible technological traces and extraterrestrial civilisations from outside the earth," according to a report published Tuesday in Science and Technology Daily, the official newspaper of the Ministry of Science and Technology.

The signals were discovered by China's 500-meter Aperture Spherical Radio Telescope (FAST,) the only giant, single-dish, radio telescope in the world. It is known informally as "Sky Eye," the newspaper said.

Cosmologist Zhang Tongjie, once dubbed "China's top alien hunter," said FAST located "several narrow-band electromagnetic signals different from the past," the newspaper reported.

Zhang was also quoted by the newspaper as saying the new signals could just be radio interference.

"The possibility that the suspicious signal is some kind of radio interference is also very high, and it needs to be further confirmed and ruled out. This may be a long process." Zhang said.

As Insider's Azmi Haroun previously reported, the FAST telescope, which is located in Guizhou province, can detect faint radio-waves from pulsars and materials in galaxies far away.

The dish was completed in 2016 and the observatory cost $171 million.

As of September 2020, one of the telescope's main functions has been to search for extraterrestrial life. Beijing Normal University is working alongside scientists from University of California, Berkeley, on the programme.

To date, those researchers have identified two sets of signals from 2019 when processing data in 2022 and one set of signals this year, Zhang told Science and Technology Daily.


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