(Photo by Gallo Images/Brenton Geach)
(Photo by Gallo Images/Brenton Geach)
  • The world’s richest person, Bill Gates, and his wife Melinda visited Khayelitsha outside Cape Town on Friday. 
  • Bill is again the world’s richest man after Amazon’s shares plunged 7% recently, making Jeff Bezos the world’s second-richest man.  
  • It is unclear why Bill and Melinda visited Khayelitsha, but through their foundation they’ve already invested millions in the country, and they are heavily involved in trying to solve sanitation challenges.
  • For more stories go to www.BusinessInsider.co.za

The world’s richest person Bill Gates, and his wife Melinda visited, Khayelitsha, roughly 30 minutes outside Cape Town’s city centre, on Friday afternoon. 

Bill was named the world’s richest man again on Friday after Amazon founder Jeff Bezos fortune declined when shares in his company fell by 7%, The Economic Times reported.

Bezos previously ended Bill’s 24-year run as the richest man in 2018. 

Bill, who co-founded Microsoft, now has a net worth of approximately $105.7 billion (roughly R1.5 trillion).

(Photo by Gallo Images/Brenton Geach)
(Photo by Gallo Images/Brenton Geach)

The couple has given away $45 billion (roughly R658 billion) of their fortune to philanthropic causes, including efforts to solve sanitation challenges and eradicate some diseases.

They visited Inkanini Primary School and a creche in the Site B Informal Settlement. 

It was unclear why they decided to visit the community. 

(Photo by Gallo Images/Brenton Geach)
(Photo by Gallo Images/Brenton Geach)
(Photo by Gallo Images/Brenton Geach)
(Photo by Gallo Images/Brenton Geach)
(Photo by Gallo Images/Brenton Geach)
(Photo by Gallo Images/Brenton Geach)

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation gave its first research grants in South Africa in 1999, to address issues such as the high rate of HIV and TB. 

According to the foundation’s website, it currently funds over 100 organisations in the country.

(Photo by Gallo Images/Brenton Geach)
(Photo by Gallo Images/Brenton Geach)

Among the goals it seeks to achieve in South Africa are to discover and develop new drugs, diagnostic methods, and vaccines for HIV and TB. It also supports the effective delivery of proven HIV prevention and treatment plans. 

South Africa comprises less than 1% of the global population, but contributes up to 18% of the world’s HIV infections and HIV-related deaths, and 6% of the world’s TB infections and 2.5% of global TB-related deaths, the foundation said.

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