• Airlines have stopped ordering Boeing 737 planes, according to the company's first quarter data, a troubling sign for the future of company's fastest selling airplane.
  • Boeing announced on Tuesday that no new orders of the 737 Max were made in March.
  • Last week, Boeing announced it would be reducing its production of the 737 Max planes as it works to make safety changes following two fatal crashes involving the planes.

Airlines have stopped ordering Boeing 737 Max planes, according to company's first quarter sales data, a troubling sign for the future of what was previously its fastest selling airplane.

New data released on Tuesday pointed to no new orders of the 737 Max in March.

The report also showed a dip in deliveries of all 737 models, including the older 737-800, which fell to 89 this year, a major decrease from 132 last year during the same period.

Boeing on Friday said it would be reducing its production of the 737 Max planes as it works to make safety changes following two fatal crashes involving the model.

Consumers have distanced themselves from the 737 Max planes in the wake of the fatal crash of Ethiopian Airlines flight ET302, which took place on March 10. It marked the second crash involving a Boeing 737 Max plane since October, prompting more than 50 countries and airlines from around the world to ground the plane over safety concerns.

Initial findings from the Ethiopian Airlines crash show faulty readings on the plane's angle-of-attack (AOA) sensor caused the system to automatically push the plane's nose downward.

Last month the company announced it would be updating the 737 Max flight-control software in a bid to save the reputation of its newest airliner.

Boeing stocks took a tumble on Monday after the company put out a statement admitting to fault in the deadly crashes.

"We now know that the recent Lion Air Flight 610 and Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 accidents were caused by a chain of events, with a common chain link being erroneous activation of the aircraft's MCAS function," the company's statement said.

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